Best Time to Fly to Mexico

Peak Season:

Southern-coast resorts are packed with tourists between July and September, especially since July and August are the peak holiday months for foreign visitors and native Mexicans. Semana Santa (the week before Easter) and Christmas week are also very busy. 

Off Season:

Right after the rainy season is a good time to take a flight to Mexico - smaller crowd and discounted hotel rates are commonly found. The hills and mountains are green from the rain however, it can still be very humid in Puerto Vallarta.

Why you should take a flight to Mexico

Thanks to the more than 20 million tourists booking airline tickets to Mexico every year, Mexico enjoys a stable economy and financial peace of mind. Mexico is the fifth-largest country in the Americas and the 14th largest country in the world. In fact, the World Tourism Organization listed Mexico as one of the largest tourism industries in the world. No matter where your flight to Mexico lands – from Cancun to Tijuana – tourists are greeted by friendly faces. 

Nearly 100 million people call Mexico home – 22 million of them live in Mexico City, the capital of Mexico – but even with the vast amounts of people residing here there is one innate quality: in Mexico, everybody takes life a little bit easier. Those who visit Mexico regularly will agree that once you’re here it’s inevitable not to slow down. So before boarding the flight to Mexico, take a deep breath and relax. Once the plane to Mexico lands, grab a cerveza and join the festivities. 

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Mexico climate

Mexico City and the rest of Mexico’s higher, inland elevations are temperate and dry, but the coastal plains are hot and humid. Temperatures range between 70 and 90 F in the daytime. From May to October it’s hot and humid, especially on the coasts. It cools down a bit the rest of the year, which is a good time for last minute flights to Mexico. Some inland areas can even reach freezing temperatures in the winter. The rainy season lasts from May through September, with some slight variations in different areas. Acapulco and Puerto Vallarta see most of their rain from June to October, while its mid-September through mid-November in Cancun. Rain usually falls more on the coast than the higher elevations. The hurricane season lasts from late September to early November in Puerto Vallarta and in from May through September in Cancun.

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Getting around Mexico

For getting around on your own, walking or renting a car or moped are popular options.

Mexico has more 20 airports, which makes getting from one part of the country to another easy. Domestic flights are cheap and reliable.

Mexican cities and resorts typically have public transportation and taxis. Check before you go to find out what is best at your destination. For example: Cancun has a popular city-bus system. There are also private buses, but they charge far more than the city buses. Puerto Vallarta’s city buses are easy to use, inexpensive, and can take you to most locations. However, stay away from buses named Rambo, Terminator, etc. They don’t always stop for pedestrians, and they frequently have accidents that result in fatalities. In Cozumel getting to some of the hotels and the beaches requires transportation. Cozumel has a strong cabbies’ union and the fares are set (there’s no bargaining). Mexico City has an extensive public transportation system, lots of taxis, and a problem with crime.

The following chart gives approximate journey times from

The following chart gives approximate journey times from

Mexico City

(in hours and minutes) to other major cities and towns in Mexico.

 AirRoad
Acapulco0.353.30
Cancún2.2030.00
Chihuahua2.2034.00
Puerto Vallarta1.5514.00

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Mexico Travel Information

  • With the clear water and white-sand beaches of the Caribbean, Cancun is Mexico’s most popular tourist destination. A gracious host to visitors, Cancun offers extensive water activities — snorkeling, scuba diving, parachuting, jet skiing — as well as spas, shopping, dining, dancing, and Cancun hotels meant for every traveler, from the budget-conscience to the luxurious. The outlying areas also offer attractions from Mayan ruins to ecological theme parks.
  • On the Pacific coast, Acapulco is one of Mexico’s best-known resorts and, with its recent major revamping, is again a very popular resort. A party town, Acapulco goes nonstop and is a playground day and night. Days can be spent jet skiing, water skiing, playing golf or tennis, or lazing on the beach before partying all night.
  • Also on the Pacific coast, Puerto Vallarta has miles of beaches, cliffs, and the Sierra Madres as a backdrop. You won’t be bored here: stroll the cobblestone streets, shops, and galleries; dine in one of over 200 restaurants; try mountain biking, whale-watching, or sea kayaking. Puerta Vallarta is hard to leave, as its American, European, and Canadian residents can attest.
  • Cozumel is one of the top diving locations in the world. Surrounded by more than 25 reef formations, there’s diving for all levels of experience. White, sandy beaches line both sides of the island with gentle waves on the leeward (western) side and huge crashing waves on the windward (eastern) side. The waterfront area is well populated with shops, and San Miguel the only town.
  • Mexico City is one of the largest, most complex cities in the world. The architecture reflects the city’s cultural history, from pre-Hispanic remains to modern skyscrapers. As an urban playground, Mexico City offers trendy restaurants and nightlife, plenty of Mexico City hotels, excellent museums, and the central square’s cobblestone, tree-lined streets. The city also has its share of crime — be cautious and stay alert.

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Passport and Visa Information

US citizens need a valid passport or passport card to enter the country. No visa is required.

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Entry requirements

US citizens need a valid passport or passport card to enter the country. No visa is required.

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Melisse Hinkle
A New England native but explorer at heart, Melisse has lived in four U.S. cities, spent a summer in Hawaii, made her way through wine-producing regions in Australia and New Zealand, and traveled around Europe while studying abroad in London. She is the Content Manager for the U.S. and Canada at Cheapflights.
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    Cheap flights to Mexico

    New York (NYC) to Cancun (CUN)
    from$372RTwith CheapAir.com
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    Approx flight times

    John F. Kennedy International to General Juan N. Alvarez:
    5 hr 28 mins
    La Guardia to Cancun International:
    6 hr 33 mins
    John F. Kennedy International to Cancun International:
    4 hr 3 mins
    Newark International to Cancun International:
    4 hr 11 mins
    La Guardia to Cozumel:
    7 hr 17 mins
    John F. Kennedy International to Aeropuerto Internacional Benito Juarez:
    4 hr 57 mins
    Newark International to Aeropuerto Internacional Benito Juarez:
    5 hr 7 mins

    In-flight reading

    The Course of Mexican History

    Michael C. Meyer, William L Sherman, and Susan M. DeedsHistory, culture, and politics from the pre-Columbian period to the present, including recent findings on Mayan culture and the colonial period, Mexico’s efforts to democratize, and the effects of NAFTA.

    The Death of Artemio Cruz

    Carlos Fuentes, trans. Alfred MacAdamWritten more than 25 years ago, still-popular novel about the life of a newspaper owner and land baron, his loss of idealism after the revolution and rise to wealth and corruption.

    Like Water for Chocolate

    Laura EsquivelHer destiny is remain single and care for her mother. So when her lover is married off to her sister, Tita’s emotions find their way into her art form, cooking.

    The Cities of Ancient Mexico

    Jeremy A. SabloffAn introduction to ancient Mexico that takes you to cities such as Teotihuacan, Palenque, and Monte Alban and explains what archaeology tells us about them and why they flourished.

    Mexico’s Fortress Monasteries

    Richard PerryA guide to over more than ancient monasteries, many of which have extraordinary murals, paintings, fonts, and altarpieces, and most of which are not in the typical tourist guide.