Airport guide

Airports in Dominican Republic

Best Time to Fly to Dominican Republic

Peak season:

Thanks to the great weather, most of the year is peak season. Rainy season hits the north coast between October and May and the south coast from May to October, meaning that there are always dry beaches to be found. The rains can last half a day when they arrive, however, so be prepared. As with the rest of the Caribbean, the country is most visited by tourists during the “winter” months of December-April as vacationers escape the bad weather of their own countries.

Off season:

Prices fall after the Easter holidays and the country is less invaded by tourists. It's likely to be the best time to find cheap flights to the Dominican Republic. The hurricane season, between June and November, is the least popular time to visit.

Why you should take a flight to Dominican Republic

Sugar-white beaches, beautiful landscapes, and the rhythmic sounds of Latin American music welcomes visitors off the flights to the Dominican Republic. Aside from being a hospitable country with loads of opportunities for travelers – including swimming, snorkeling, and sight-seeing – the Dominican Republic is one of the cheaper destinations for travelers in North America. Airline tickets to the Dominican Republic can always be found. 

Some Dominican Republic flights arrive in the capital, Santo Domingo, which is the oldest remaining European city in the New World and one of the most vibrant cities in the Caribbean. Travelers book Dominican Republic flights to walk in the footsteps of Cortés, Ponce de León, and Christopher Columbus. Santo Domingo is also home to one of the largest shopping bazaars of the Caribbean. Travelers leaving the Dominican Republic will take with them local jewelry and artifacts, artists' renderings of landscapes, and if one is lucky enough, a hand-wrapped cigar. 

Book a trip to the Dominican Republic to soak up the sun.

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Dominican Republic climate

The Dominican Republic’s climate is great all year long. In the summer, temperatures range from 70 F to 90 F, and it only drops a bit in the winter. The weather can get much cooler in the mountains, and rainstorms are usually brief.

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Getting around Dominican Republic

There are seven international airports in the country and domestic Dominican Republic flights between the main tourist regions are readily available from Air Santo Domingo. Dominican Republic flights are cheap and reliable.

There is no train service in the DR, but buses are frequent, inexpensive and often air-conditioned. There is an extensive network that covers most of the country. However, be aware that services stop at 9pm, so travel throughout the night is not possible.

Tourist taxis are available in most towns, and from airports. Prices are not cheap and often more than double those of the “city taxis” which tend to be less modern cars.

Car rental is expensive and not available to under-25s. Roads are not very safe and littered with accident. Transport police are often corrupt, so if you are driving expect to pay some bribes.

The following chart gives approximate journey times from

The following chart gives approximate journey times from

Santo Domingo

(in hours and minutes) to other major cities and towns in Dominican Republic.

 AirRoad
Puerto Plata0.453.15
Samaná0.353.30
La Romana0.253.30
Barahona-3.30

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Dominican Republic Travel Information

  • There are more than 1,000 miles of coastline surrounding the country, nearly all with golden sand, palm trees and warm clear waters, so finding the perfect beach isn’t difficult. The western region is generally less-explored so if you’re after solitude head out to the beaches on the southwest coast.
  • One of the world’s largest populations of American crocodiles can be found at National Park Isla Cabritos – an island in the middle of Lake Enriguillo. The best time to get a sighting of the crocs is early morning or evening, when they warm themselves in the sun. To get the best view, take a boat trip into the lake, which will cost about $60 per boat.
  • The Punta Cana region is the most visited by tourists. Beaches are made up of white sand, there is a bustling nightlife and many of the all-inclusive resorts are based in the area. A popular day trip for children is to Manati Park, to see wildlife, including the much-loved dolphin, and displays of Taino dancing.
  • The largest of the DR’s national parks is Jaragua: more than 560 square miles. It’s home to more than 130 species of bird, including a large population of pink flamingos.
  • The country is often listed as one of the best in the Caribbean for diving. The waters on the south are warm and protected, those on the north boast centuries-old shipwrecks. Also on the north coast is Cayo Arena, a circular sand island with stunning coral reef.
  • Santo Domingo is the capital and one of the most vibrant cities in the country. It is the oldest continually inhabited European city in the Caribbean and was founded by Bartholomew Columbus, Christopher’s brother.
  • The Dominican Republic produces the most cigars in the world and claims to make superior varieties even to Cuba. Its most famous brand is Romeo y Julieta. If you’re planning on bringing some back, however, make sure you check the customs limits permitted.

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Dominican Republic airports

Major airports include:

Punta Cana International Airport (PUJ). The airport is situated within 30 minutes of most hotels in the Punta Cana resort area.

Las Americas International Airport (SDQ). The airport is situated 18 miles east of Santo Domingo.

Puerto Plata Gregorio Luperon Airport (POP). The airport is located 11 miles from Puerto Plata.

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Passport and Visa Information

American citizens need a valid passport and a Tourist Card, which can be purchased for $10 when you arrive at the airport.

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Entry requirements

American citizens need a valid passport and a Tourist Card, which can be purchased for $10 when you arrive at the airport.

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Melisse Hinkle
A New England native but explorer at heart, Melisse has lived in four U.S. cities, spent a summer in Hawaii, made her way through wine-producing regions in Australia and New Zealand, and traveled around Europe while studying abroad in London. She is the Content Manager for the U.S. and Canada at Cheapflights.
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    Approx flight times

    Newark International to Puerto Plata:
    4 hr 0 mins
    La Guardia to Las Americas:
    6 hr 20 mins
    John F. Kennedy International to Las Americas:
    3 hr 47 mins
    Newark International to Las Americas:
    3 hr 55 mins
    John F. Kennedy International to Cibao:
    3 hr 38 mins
    Newark International to Cibao:
    3 hr 54 mins
    John F. Kennedy International to Punta Cana:
    3 hr 50 mins

    In-flight reading

    Before We Were Free

    Julia AlvarezAn insight to the oppressive Trujillo regime. Anita de la Torre is a 12-year-old girl living in the Dominican Republic who gradually becomes aware that her family are involved in a plot to kill the dictator.

    The Farming of Bones

    Edwige DanticatAmabelle Desir is an orphaned Haitian working as a housemaid in the Dominican Republic. The novel looks at the civil war between the two countries.

    Why the Cocks Fight: Dominicans, Haitians and the struggle for Hispaniola

    Michelle WuckerAn exploration of the unrest on the island of Hispaniola and the constant struggle between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.