Quirky travel finds: The Heidelberg Project

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You can rest assured no two visits to this open-air art installation will ever be the same.

Sometimes, one of the most appealing things about the places we visit is watching them evolve over time. As the landmarks change, each visit feels like a brand new experience. At The Heidelberg Project in Detroit, Mich., you can rest assured no two visits to this open-air art installation will ever be the same.

Heidelberg Project (Image: Eva Blue)
Heidelberg Project (Image: Eva Blue)
Heidelberg Project (Image: nic_r used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)
Heidelberg Project (Image: nic_r used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)
Heidelberg Project (Image: MadeByMark)
Heidelberg Project (Image: MadeByMark)

What started as taking a stand against the poverty and deterioration that had overwhelmed artist Tyree Guyton’s childhood home, The Heidelberg Project has evolved into one of the quirkiest and most symbolic art projects in the country.

The art installation started in the 1980s with nothing more than painting bright and colorful dots on houses throughout the street, and taking salvaged items and transforming them into works of art. The goal? To turn a rundown neighborhood into a living art installation where residents could be proud of their homes.

Heidelberg Project (Image: ellenm1)
Heidelberg Project (Image: ellenm1)
Heidelberg Project (Image: Eva Blue)
Heidelberg Project (Image: Eva Blue)

Since its inception, The Heidelberg Project has certainly accomplished its mission. The homes and installations continue to evolve, ever adding recycled rubbish and colors to create symbolic and moving pieces of outdoor art.

Heidelberg Project (Image: jbcurio)
Heidelberg Project (Image: jbcurio)

The project is free to visit. Simply take a stroll down this residential street on the East Side and soak up the creativity that radiates from each of the colorful homes, stuffed animal-laden poles and salvaged cars.

Learn more about this installation at The Heidelberg Project’s website.

(Main image: Eva Blue)

Quirky travel finds: The Heidelberg Project was last modified: June 26th, 2019 by Marissa Willman
Author: Marissa Willman (786 posts)

Marissa Willman earned a bachelor's degree in journalism before downsizing her life into two suitcases for a teaching gig in South Korea. Seoul was her home base for two years of wanderlusting throughout six countries in Asia. In 2011, Marissa swapped teaching for travel writing and now calls Southern California home.