Cute factor: Norway’s dogsled airport shuttle service

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This may be the cutest form of airport transportation yet.

You’ve tried buses. You’ve hailed cabs. And if your hotel offered free airport shuttle service, you’d be all over it. But the latest in airport transportation isn’t going to leave you stressed out, cramped inside of a crowded bus or rushing to catch the last shuttle – in fact, this new offering in Norway doesn’t even use motors.

And it may be the cutest form of airport transportation yet.

At Norway’s Kirkenes Snowhotel, you can opt for a husky-pulled dogsled to take you to and from the nearby Kirkenes Airport.

Cute factor: Norway's dogsled airport-to-hotel shuttle service 1

The snow-covered landscape provides the perfect opportunity for visitors to enjoy a scenic 45-minute sled ride through Norway. You’ll even be able to see Russia during your trip, whose proximity to the airport caused the hotel to obtain the all clear from Norway’s military police before launching the husky sled service.

Each sled fits two guests, and you’ll be given a set of thermal clothes to help you brave the wind as you ride with your new furry friends.

Cute factor: Norway's dogsled airport-to-hotel shuttle service 1

You can even spend some quality time with a few of the hotel’s 200 dogs on one of the hotel’s husky trips, which includes a quick primer in handling your eight-canine team, a set of warm clothes, sledding equipment and a two- or four-hour experience with the hotel’s huskies.

While you’re at the Snowhotel, don’t miss the Icebar, where carefully chiseled ice sculptures and a literal ice bar set the scene for an evening of vodka drinks served in ice glasses.

(All images courtesy of Kirkenes Snowhotel)

Cute factor: Norway’s dogsled airport shuttle service was last modified: June 26th, 2019 by Marissa Willman
Author: Marissa Willman (786 posts)

Marissa Willman earned a bachelor's degree in journalism before downsizing her life into two suitcases for a teaching gig in South Korea. Seoul was her home base for two years of wanderlusting throughout six countries in Asia. In 2011, Marissa swapped teaching for travel writing and now calls Southern California home.