15 US cities with the quirkiest names

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From Uncertain to Idiotville, we’ve rounded up 15 American cities with the quirkiest names – take a look at which cities made the list.

What do Hell, Looneyville and Boring have in common? No, we’re not setting up a bad joke – it turns out these are all real places in the U.S. From Uncertain to Idiotville, we’ve rounded up 15 American cities with the quirkiest names – take a look at which cities made the list.

Flippin, Arkansas

Flippin, Arkansas (Image: uberculture)
Flippin, Arkansas (Image: uberculture)

This Arkansas town in the Ozark Mountains makes for amusing signs all across the city.

Uncertain, Texas

The surveyors of Texas’ so-called best-kept secret couldn’t tell whether the city was in Texas or Louisiana, hence the name.

George, Washington

An homage to our nation’s first president, George, Washington was named in the 1950s by local pharmacist Charlie Brown.

Boring, Oregon

Boring, Oregon (Image: chrismurf used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)
Boring, Oregon (Image: chrismurf used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)

Boring bills itself as “an exciting place to live,” perhaps because it was named not for a lack of things to do but for its founder, William H. Boring.

Looneyville, Texas

Remember that time your mom said you were going to send her straight to the looney bin? As it turns out, it’s a real place! Well, almost. Looneyville is actually a farming community in eastern Texas.

Idiotville, Oregon

At least no one actually lives in Idiotville – this Oregon locale is now a ghost town, said to have earned its name for being so remote only an idiot would live there.

Intercourse, Pennsylvania

Intercourse, Pennsylvania (Image: Dougtone used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)
Intercourse, Pennsylvania (Image: Dougtone used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)

While tourists love the town’s risqué name, Intercourse is actually an Amish town where you’re more likely to see a horse and buggy than anything remotely related to the town’s suggestive name.

Truth or Consequences, New Mexico

The spa town of Hot Springs, New Mexico renamed itself Truth or Consequences in 1950 to win a contest by the radio program of the same name.

Hell, Michigan

With its slogan of “Go to Hell!” it’s safe to say that Hell, Michigan has embraced its rather interesting name.

Why, Arizona

Why, Arizona (Image: Ken Lund used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)
Why, Arizona (Image: Ken Lund used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license)

We can’t help but feel a question mark is missing from Why, Arizona. The rural town was actually named for a “Y”-shaped freeway intersection that’s since been replaced by a “T”-shaped intersection. No word on whether the town will consider renaming.

Carefree, Arizona

It’s only fitting that Carefree, Arizona is filled with streets bearing names like Rocking Chair Road, Tranquil Trail and Easy Street.

Last Chance, Idaho

As it turns out, Last Chance is actually a haven for outdoor recreation like trout fishing and nearby hiking.

Accident, Maryland

Accident, Maryland (Image: pattista)
Accident, Maryland (Image: pattista)

No one knows for sure how Accident, Maryland got its name, but we’re guessing it was an accident.

Greasy, Oklahoma

The name of this Oklahoma town begs the question: Are locals known as Greasers?

Embarrass, Wisconsin

The town was named for the French word “embarrase,” which means “to impede.” Somehow, we think something got lost in translation.

(Main image: Danielle Walquist Lynch)

15 US cities with the quirkiest names was last modified: June 26th, 2019 by Marissa Willman
Author: Marissa Willman (786 posts)

Marissa Willman earned a bachelor's degree in journalism before downsizing her life into two suitcases for a teaching gig in South Korea. Seoul was her home base for two years of wanderlusting throughout six countries in Asia. In 2011, Marissa swapped teaching for travel writing and now calls Southern California home.